New York Times 纽约时报中学生赛事合集

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1.       New York Times: Personal Narratives

We’re looking for “short, powerful stories about meaningful life experiences.” We want to hear your story, told in your unique voice.

 

1.1.      Contest Dates

All entries must be submitted by Oct. 29, 2019, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern.

 

1.2.     Contest Rules and Guidelines

    • Tell us a short, powerful, true story. Remember: This is not an invitation to give us your opinion on a topic you’re passionate about.
    • Write it in your own real voice, with vivid descriptive language
    • Keep it to 600 words
    • Write something original: Please don’t submit anything you have already published at the time of submission.
    • Submit only one narrative per student
    • Students in the United States and the United Kingdom must be from 13 to 19 years old to participate. However, if you are submitting from anywhere else in the world, you must be between 16 and 19 years old.
    • The children and stepchildren of the New York Times employees,or teenagers who live in the same household as a Times employee, are not eligible to enter this contest.

 

1.3.     Prize

Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in print.

 

1.4.     Past Winners.

2019: 8 Winners, 8 Runners-up,19 Honorable Mentions. Below is the link to the winning essays.

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest

 

2.     New York Times: Student Review Contest

Do you have strong opinions about books, music, fashion, restaurants or TV shows? Are you a theater buff or a gamer? If so, you’re in luck. We invite you to play critic and write an original review for our Fifth Annual Student Review Contest. What can you choose? Anything that fits into a category of creative expression that The New York Times covers — from architecture to video games. We do ask, however, that you pick something new to you. Part of the reason we created this contest is to encourage you to stretch your cultural imagination. So go see a local art, design or fashion show; explore a building; watch a movie or TV show or dance performance or play; listen to an album; read a book; play a game or eat in a restaurant that is novel and interesting to you.

 

2.1.     Contest Dates

The deadline for this contest is Dec. 17 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

 

2.2.    Contest Guidelines

    • Categories of Creative Expression: Books, music, movies, theater, TV shows, fashion, architecture, dance, art, restaurants, comedy, hotels, technology, video games;
    • Be concise: 450 words or fewer, not including the title.
    • Assert an opinion and back it up
    • Write something original: For this contest, you cannot submit anything you have already published, whether in a school newspaper or elsewhere.
    • Whatever you choose to review, it should be new to you
    • Only one submission per student is allowed
    • Two entry categories: “middle school” and “high school”: Students who are ages 10 - 14 from anywhere in the world can participate in the middle school category. Students who are ages 13 - 19 from anywhere in the world can participate in the high school category. Students who are ages 13 and 14 can participate in either contest category. However, they must choose one category; they cannot submit to both. Students who are ages 16 - 19 can use the student submission form to enter this contest. Teachers from around the world can use the teacher submission form to submit entries on behalf of students who are ages 10 - 19.
    • The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees are not eligible to enter this contest. Nor are teenagers who live in the same household as a Times employee.

 

2.3.     Prize

Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in print.

 

2.4.    Past Winners

    • 2018: 10 winners, 13 runners-up, 32 honorable mentions, 1964 entries;
    • 2017: 10 winners, 15 runners-up, 20 honorable mentions, 1494 entries;
    • 2016: 10 winners, 24 runners-up, 28 honorable mentions, over 1250 entries;
    • 2015: 9 winners, 9 runners-up, 22 honorable mentions, over 1600 entries;

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest

 

3.      New York Times: Connections Contest

Essentially, we’re asking students to do what we do every day: connect what’s in The Times with what you’re learning in school. But if you simply open nytimes.com and start clicking around, you’ll see that the task is not that hard. The Times publishes hundreds of articles from around the globe every day, so you can almost always find something that confronts the very same themes, questions or issues that you’ve been discussing in class.

 

3.1.     Contest Dates

The deadline for this contest is Jan. 21, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time.

 

3.2.     Contest Rules and Guidelines

    • Choose some piece of academic content. It may be a work of literature, an event in history, a concept in civics, a phenomenon in science or something else entirely.
    • Connect what’s in The Times. Find something published in The New York Times anytime in 2019 or 2020 that you think connects to your chosen subject in some interesting, meaningful way, and explain how. You can pick any article, Op-Ed, image, video, graphic or podcast, or anything else you like, as long as it was published in The Times in 2019 or 2020.
    • In 450 words or fewer.
    • Create something original. For this contest, you cannot submit anything you have already published, whether in a school newspaper or elsewhere. Be careful not to plagiarize.
    • Submit only one entry for this contest
    • You can work alone or in a pair. If you’re working with a partner, one student will have to be the primary contact.
    • Students who are ages 13 - 19 from anywhere in the world can participate. Teachers from around the world can use the teacher submission form to submit entries on behalf of students who are ages 13 - 19. We define “teacher” as someone who is 18 or older and who helps to educate a child. This definition can include traditional teachers as well as tutors, librarians and parents. Students who are ages 16 - 19 can use the student submission form to enter this contest.
    • The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees are not eligible to enter this contest. Nor are teenagers who live in the same household as a Times employee.

 

3.3.     Prize
Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in print.

 

3.4.    Past Winners

    • 2018-2019: 10 winners, 20 runners-up, 19 honorable mentions, over 2000 entries;
    • 2017-2018: 8 winners, 17 runners-up, 41 honorable mentions, over 1200 entries;

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest

 

4.     New York Times – STEM Writing Contest

Explain a complex and interesting science, math, engineering or technology concept to a general audience. This contest is inspired by Trilobites, the Science Times column that does just that. Rules and guidelines coming soon.

 

UPDATED: JAN. 23 – MARCH 3, 2020

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest

 

5.      New York Times: Student Editorial Contest

Now, for the seventh year in a row, we’re inviting them to make those thoughts into something a little more formal: short, evidence-based persuasive essays like the editorials The New York Times publishes every day. Students, the challenge is fairly straightforward. Choose a topic you care about — whether it’s something we’ve addressed on this site or not — then gather evidence from sources both within and outside The New York Times and write a concise editorial (450 words or fewer) to convince readers of your view.

 

5.1.     Contest Dates

Feb. 13, 2020 - April 1, 2020

 

5.2.    Contest Rules and Guidelines

    • Write your editorial about any topic you like, as long as you use at least one source from The Times
    • Use at least one non-Times source
    • Always cite your sources
    • The editorial must not exceed 450 words. Your title and list of sources are separate, however, and do not count as part of your 450-word limit.
    • Have an Opinion . Editorials are different from news articles because they try to persuade readers to share your point of view. Don’t be afraid to take a stand.
    • Write your editorial by yourself or with a group, but please submit only one editorial per student. If you are working as a team, just remember to submit all of your names when you post your entry.
    • Submissions must be from middle and high school students. We are still determining what the minimum age will be. Please stay tuned.
    • The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees, or teenagers who live in the same household as a Times employee, are not eligible to enter this contest.

 

5.3.     Prize

Having your work published on The Learning Network — and, potentially, in print in a Times special section.

 

5.4.    Past Winners

    • 2019: 11 winners, 27 runners-up, 32 honorable mentions, 10509 entries;
    • 2018: 9 winners, 26 runners-up, 38 honorable mentions, 9275 entries;
    • 2017: 10 winners, 15 runners-up, 45 honorable mentions, 7895 entries;
    • 2016: 10 winners, 20 runners-up, 24 honorable mentions, over 6300 entries;
    • 2015: 10 winners, 15 runners-up, 31 honorable mentions, nearly 4500 entries;

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest

 

6.     New York Times: Summer Reading Contest

At a time when teachers are looking for ways to offer students more “voice and choice,” we hope our open-ended contest can help: Every week, we ask participants to choose something in The Times that has sparked their interest, then tell us why. At the end of the week, judges from the Times newsroom pick favorite responses, and we publish them. It’s as simple as that. We will update this page with more detailed rules and a submission form on or before June 12, 2020.

 

6.1.     Contest Dates

June 12 – Aug. 21, 2020

 

6.2.    Contest Rules and Guidelines

    • Every Friday during the contest, we will post the same questions: “What interested you most in The Times this week? Why?” That is where you should post your picks (and reasons) any time until the next Friday. Then we will close that post to comments and open a new one with the same questions.
    • You can choose from anything published in the print paper or on NYTimes.com in 2020, including videos, graphics, slide shows and podcasts.
    • Feel free to participate any or every week, but we allow only one submission per person per week.
    • Responses must be 300 words or fewer.
    • Submissions must be from middle and high school students. We are still determining what the minimum age will be. Please stay tuned.
    • The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees, or teenagers who live in the same household as a Times employee, are not eligible to enter this contest.

 

6.3.    Prizes

Having your work published on The Learning Network.

 

6.4.    Past Winners

2019: 100 winners, 100–400 runners-up and honorable mentions (combined) , 10509 entries;

 

Jump To ... Personal Narratives Contest | Student Review Contest | Connections Contest | STEM Writing Contest | Student Editorial ContestSummer Reading Contest